Bike base strength workout: how to build good foundations

It’s time to introduce some base training and cadence variation into your off-season schedule

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Getting back into training can be fun – no really! And the best way to start back is to introduce some base training and variation with cadences to really build the foundations for the season ahead, which will ultimately allow you to sustain higher training loads.

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In this month’s session we’re doing 2 x 15min blocks of over-gear work using a cadence of around 55-65 revs per minute. Try to complete each 15 minutes in your race position, and keep your pelvis and core stable, i.e. keeping rocking to a minimum. I’d also like you to stay in the saddle for the full duration. 

In the first six weeks of your winter training I’d look to incorporate one session per week. As you start to build
fitness, increase the blocks by five minutes until you’re at a stage where you can sustain a complete 1hr at that pace. 

To sustain the effort you need to be able to hold 80% of your threshold pace, so moderate pacing is needed. 

The session

Warm-up 

10mins easy @90-100rpm

Main set 

15mins moderate @55-65rpm

10mins easy @90-100rpm

15mins moderate @55-65rpm

Cool-down 

10mins easy 

High cadence recovery

Adapt for beginners

If you’re new to this type of training then start with 3 x 5mins with 5mins recovery between sets. Complete 1hr in duration. 

Adapt for Ironman

Start with 3 x 15mins with 10mins recovery between each. Build this up week on week so you’re at a point where you can sustain 3 x 30mins.

  

Top 3 tips

Plan your strength work

Adding strength and mobility work into your weekly schedule will increase your power and help keep the risk of injury to a minimum.

Use a foam roller 

Using a foam roller will allow you to really get into the fascia of the muscle, so again try and incorporate this into your post-session routine until it becomes commonplace.

Track your training

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A heart-rate monitor allows you to see how you’re adapting to training. In conjunction with a power meter you can also track power/HR to see how your fitness is progressing.