Garmin Forerunner 15 review

A fine GPS/HRM, but more for fitness goers than triathletes

Our rating 
4.0 out of 5 star rating 4.0
£169.99
12868-770456b-e3f98a2.jpg

The FR15 eclipses the FR10 as Garmin’s entry-level GPS running watch and comes in at £139.99 if you forego the HRM and chest strap.

Advertisement

It comes in a range of colourways, highlighting its mass appeal, though some will feel its slightly bulbous look cheapens the aesthetic. Satellite pick-up and retention is impressive, but it’s the activity tracker that’ll pique the interest of the wider fitness market. 

Acting like the Garmin Vivofit to monitor your daily steps, it’s the feature that truly separates it from the FR10. That and the battery life, which is an improvement on its predecessor, coming in at 5-8hrs in GPS mode. 

Yes, that excludes it from Ironman duties, but long-course athletes will inevitably be seeking something that offers more than two data fields, though that limited option does mean the text is easy to read. 

The fact it’s not swim- or cycle-specific could deter many shorter-course athletes too, though a simple bike mount will give you data on two wheels. You can download your results to Garmin Connect via USB though not Bluetooth, which is a shame.

For news and reviews of all the latest tri kit, head to our Gear section

.

The FR15 eclipses the FR10 as Garmin’s entry-level GPS running watch and comes in at £139.99 if you forego the HRM and chest strap.

It comes in a range of colourways, highlighting its mass appeal, though some will feel its slightly bulbous look cheapens the aesthetic. Satellite pick-up and retention is impressive, but it’s the activity tracker that’ll pique the interest of the wider fitness market. 

Acting like the Garmin Vivofit to monitor your daily steps, it’s the feature that truly separates it from the FR10. That and the battery life, which is an improvement on its predecessor, coming in at 5-8hrs in GPS mode.

Yes, that excludes it from Ironman duties, but long-course athletes will inevitably be seeking something that offers more than two data fields, though that limited option does mean the text is easy to read.  

The fact it’s not swim- or cycle-specific could deter many shorter-course athletes too, though a simple bike mount will give you data on two wheels. You can download your results to Garmin Connect via USB though not Bluetooth, which is a shame.

For news and reviews of all the latest tri kit, head to our Gear section

Advertisement

Contact : www.garmin.com